Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Spikemoss
Spikemoss Spikemoss Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Lycophyta Class: Selaginellopsida Order: Selaginellales Family: Selaginellaceae Genus: Selaginella Species   Selaginella apoda   Selaginella eclipes   Selaginella rupestris Spikemoss refers to any plant of the genus Selaginella, in the family Selaginellaceae, in the order Selaginellales, in the class Selaginellopsida, in the division Lycophyta. Many workers still place the Selaginellales in the class Lycopsida. This group of plants are considered to be part of the fern allies. The spikemosses are creeping or ascendant plants with simple, scale-like leaves on branching stems from which roots also arise. The plants are heterosporous. Significant spikemosses
 
Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Cactus
Cactus Cacti Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Caryophyllales Family: Cactaceae Cacti or cactuses are succulent plants, well known natives of desert areas in the Americas. They have also become naturalized to similar environments in other areas. An individual plant is called a cactus. Like other succulents, cacti are well-adapted to life with little precipitation. Their leaves have evolved into needles, which in addition to
 
Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Acacia
Americas. Australian species are often called wattles. The small flowers are arranged in rounded or elongated clusters. The leaves are compound pinnate in general (see fig.). In some instances, however, more especially in the Australian species, the leaflets are suppressed and the leaf-stalks become vertically flattened, and serve the purpose of leaves. The vertical position protects the structure from the intense sunlight, as with their edges towards the sky and earth they do not intercept light so fully as ordinary horizontally placed leaves. Various species yield gum. True gum arabic is the product of Acacia senegal, abundant in both east and
 
Juniper
chinensis Juniperus coahuilensis Juniperus communis Juniperus conferta Juniperus deppeana Juniperus × fassettii Juniperus flaccida Juniperus horizontalis Juniperus monosperma Juniperus occidentalis Juniperus osteosperma Juniperus pinchotii Juniperus sabina Juniperus scopulorum Juniperus virginiana and many more Ref.: ITIS 18047 A juniper is a coniferous plant in the Genus Juniperus of the Family Cupressaceae. There are about 50 species of junipers, widely distributed throughout the northern hemisphere to tropical Africa. These vary in size and shape from tall columnar forms to low cones or spreading platter-like shrubs with long trailing branches. Junipers are monoecious or dioecious trees or shrubs with either needle-like or scale-like leaves,
 
Sundew
Sundew Sundew. Sundews are members of the genus Drosera, consisting of about 90 species of carnivorous plants. Examples of the sundew family can be found on every continent but Antarctica, they are specially abundant in South Africa and Australia. They can be found in most soil conditions, acid, sandy, stony and boggy places. The leaves have stalks with drops of
 
Syngonium
Syngonium Syngonium is a genus of about 30 species, from tropical rain forests in Central and South America. These woody climbers have leaves that change shape according to teh plant's stage of growth, and adult leaf forms are often much more lobed than the juvenile forms usually seen on small pot plants. Syngonium podophyllum has of
 
Juniper
and unwinged, hard seeds. Some are misleadingly called cedars, the common name for species in the Genus Cedrus. A number of species (such as J. chinensis from East Asia) are used in landscaping and horticulture. Junipers have distinctive false-fruits: small cones in which the waxy scales fuse together to form a fleshy "berry-like" structure. In some species these "berries" are red-brown or orange but in most they are blue and very aromatic. Some junipers are peculiar in that they have two types of evergreen leaves. Seedlings and the young twigs of older trees have small needle-like leaves. Most of the branches
 
Kudzu
the pea family. Kudzu is common throughout most of the southeastern United States and has been found as far north as Pennsylvania. The name comes from Japanese kazu (葛), meaning vine. Kudzu vines can make walking across the land nearly impossible, as it takes over all horizontal and vertical surfaces, both natural and manmade. Its dense vegetation obstructs all views and movement into the area. It kills or degrades other plants by smothering them under a solid blanket of leaves, by girdling woody stems and tree trunks, and by breaking branches or uprooting entire trees and shrubs through the sheer force
 



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