Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Wandering Jew (plant)
Commonly called the Wandering Jew, the Tradescantia pallida or Setcreasea purpurea is an evergreen perennial plant with elongated pointy leaves and small three-petaled pink flowers with yellow stamens. The leaves are most often purple, though another common variety has green and purple leaves; rarer varieties are green and white or variegated. The plant thrives in sun or light shade in subtropical areas, grows to about a foot tall, and is typically used as an ornamental in gardens and borders. The plant is also used as a ground cover or hanging plant. The plant propagates easily by cuttings; the stems are visibly
 
Cactus
Cactus Cacti Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Caryophyllales Family: Cactaceae Cacti or cactuses are succulent plants, well known natives of desert areas in the Americas. They have also become naturalized to similar environments in other areas. An individual plant is called a cactus. Like other succulents, cacti are well-adapted to life with little precipitation. Their leaves have evolved into needles, which in addition to
 
Canna lily
Canna lily Canna lily Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Liliopsida Order: Zingiberales Family: Cannaceae Genus: Canna Species The canna lily is a tropical and subtropical summer-blooming plant with broad flat leaves that grow out of a stem in a long narrow roll and then unfurl. The plants grow over five feet tall but are most often around three feet tall; they often bloom red, yellow, orange, or any combination of
 
Juniper
and unwinged, hard seeds. Some are misleadingly called cedars, the common name for species in the Genus Cedrus. A number of species (such as J. chinensis from East Asia) are used in landscaping and horticulture. Junipers have distinctive false-fruits: small cones in which the waxy scales fuse together to form a fleshy "berry-like" structure. In some species these "berries" are red-brown or orange but in most they are blue and very aromatic. Some junipers are peculiar in that they have two types of evergreen leaves. Seedlings and the young twigs of older trees have small needle-like leaves. Most of the branches
 
Maple
can be striking. They have five sepals, five petals about 3 mm long, twelve stamens about 1 cm long in two rings of six, and two pistils or a pistil with two styles. The ovary is superior and has two carpels, whose wings elongate the flowers, making it easy to tell which flowers are female. Within a few weeks of blooming, the trees drop large numbers of seeds. The leaves in most species are palmately veined, with 3-9 veins, one of which is in the middle. Several species, including the paperbark maples, Acer griseum, Manchurian maple, Acer mandshuricum, Nikko maple, Acer
 
Juniper
and unwinged, hard seeds. Some are misleadingly called cedars, the common name for species in the Genus Cedrus. A number of species (such as J. chinensis from East Asia) are used in landscaping and horticulture. Junipers have distinctive false-fruits: small cones in which the waxy scales fuse together to form a fleshy "berry-like" structure. In some species these "berries" are red-brown or orange but in most they are blue and very aromatic. Some junipers are peculiar in that they have two types of evergreen leaves. Seedlings and the young twigs of older trees have small needle-like leaves. Most of the branches
 
Acacia
Americas. Australian species are often called wattles. The small flowers are arranged in rounded or elongated clusters. The leaves are compound pinnate in general (see fig.). In some instances, however, more especially in the Australian species, the leaflets are suppressed and the leaf-stalks become vertically flattened, and serve the purpose of leaves. The vertical position protects the structure from the intense sunlight, as with their edges towards the sky and earth they do not intercept light so fully as ordinary horizontally placed leaves. Various species yield gum. True gum arabic is the product of Acacia senegal, abundant in both east and
 
Aaron's rod
Aaron's rod Aaron's rod is the popular name given to various tall flowering plants (hag taper, goldenrod, etc.). In architecture, the term is given to an ornamental rod with sprouting leaves, or sometimes with a serpent entwined round it (from the Biblical references in Exodus vii. 10 and Numbers xvii. 8). Based on an article from a well-known encyclopedia published in
 
Kudzu
the pea family. Kudzu is common throughout most of the southeastern United States and has been found as far north as Pennsylvania. The name comes from Japanese kazu (葛), meaning vine. Kudzu vines can make walking across the land nearly impossible, as it takes over all horizontal and vertical surfaces, both natural and manmade. Its dense vegetation obstructs all views and movement into the area. It kills or degrades other plants by smothering them under a solid blanket of leaves, by girdling woody stems and tree trunks, and by breaking branches or uprooting entire trees and shrubs through the sheer force
 
Fouquieria
Fouquieria Fouquieria Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Ericales/Violales Family: Fouquieriaceae Genus: Fouquieria Species Fouquieria columnaris Fouquieria splendens et al Fouquieria is a genus of about 10 species of desert plants in the family Fouquieriaceae including the ocotillo (F. splendens) and the boojum tree (F. columnaris). They have succulent stems with thinner spikes projecting from them, with leaves on the spikes. They are unrelated to cacti and do not look much like them; their stems are
 



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