Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Juniper
and unwinged, hard seeds. Some are misleadingly called cedars, the common name for species in the Genus Cedrus. A number of species (such as J. chinensis from East Asia) are used in landscaping and horticulture. Junipers have distinctive false-fruits: small cones in which the waxy scales fuse together to form a fleshy "berry-like" structure. In some species these "berries" are red-brown or orange but in most they are blue and very aromatic. Some junipers are peculiar in that they have two types of evergreen leaves. Seedlings and the young twigs of older trees have small needle-like leaves. Most of the branches
 
Liliaceae
Nothoscordum Odontostomum Ophiopogon Ornithogalum - Star of Bethlehem Paris Peliosanthes Phaedranassa Phalangium Polygonatum - Solomons seal Prosartes Quamasia Roulinia Salomonia Schoenocaulon Scilla Scoliopus Selonia Smilacina - False Solomons seal Stenanthium Streptopus Stropholirion Theropogon Tofieldia Tovaria Toxicoscordion Tracyanthus Tricyrtis Trillium - Trillium or wake-robin Triteleia Tulbaghia Tulipa - Tulip Tupistra Unifolium Urceolina Vagnera Veratrum Wurmbea Xerophyllum Zephyranthes Zigadenus Zygadenus An orange daylily The Liliaceae, or the Lily Family, is an important family of monocotyledons that includes a great number of important ornamental flowers. Plants in this family have linear leaves, mostly with parallel veins, and flower parts in threes. The family Smilacaceae
 
Fouquieria
Fouquieria Fouquieria Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Ericales/Violales Family: Fouquieriaceae Genus: Fouquieria Species Fouquieria columnaris Fouquieria splendens et al Fouquieria is a genus of about 10 species of desert plants in the family Fouquieriaceae including the ocotillo (F. splendens) and the boojum tree (F. columnaris). They have succulent stems with thinner spikes projecting from them, with leaves on the spikes. They are unrelated to cacti and do not look much like them; their stems are
 
Kudzu
the pea family. Kudzu is common throughout most of the southeastern United States and has been found as far north as Pennsylvania. The name comes from Japanese kazu (葛), meaning vine. Kudzu vines can make walking across the land nearly impossible, as it takes over all horizontal and vertical surfaces, both natural and manmade. Its dense vegetation obstructs all views and movement into the area. It kills or degrades other plants by smothering them under a solid blanket of leaves, by girdling woody stems and tree trunks, and by breaking branches or uprooting entire trees and shrubs through the sheer force
 
Venus Flytrap
Venus Flytrap Venus Flytrap Photo: Valery Beaud National Agricultural Library Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Nepenthales Family: Droseraceae Genus: Dionaea Species: muscipula Binomial name Dionaea muscipula The Venus Flytrap is a carnivorous plant. It catches its prey (insects and arachnids, mostly flies and spiders) by snapping its leaves closed, much like animals do with their mouths; indeed, the edges of the leaves are equipped with protrusions that look like a set of teeth. Once the insect has been captured,
 
Venus Flytrap
spiders) by snapping its leaves closed, much like animals do with their mouths; indeed, the edges of the leaves are equipped with protrusions that look like a set of teeth. Once the insect has been captured, the plant digests and absorbs it. The leaf then opens, and wind blows (or the rain washes) away the insect's remains. Each leaf can digest only several times, after which it withers and dies. The Venus flytrap may be the source of legends about man-eating plants. The tip of the leaf is divided into two hinged lobes that form a trap. There are many traps
 
Spikemoss
Spikemoss Spikemoss Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Lycophyta Class: Selaginellopsida Order: Selaginellales Family: Selaginellaceae Genus: Selaginella Species   Selaginella apoda   Selaginella eclipes   Selaginella rupestris Spikemoss refers to any plant of the genus Selaginella, in the family Selaginellaceae, in the order Selaginellales, in the class Selaginellopsida, in the division Lycophyta. Many workers still place the Selaginellales in the class Lycopsida. This group of plants are considered to be part of the fern allies. The spikemosses are creeping or ascendant plants with simple, scale-like leaves on branching stems from which roots also arise. The plants are heterosporous. Significant spikemosses
 
Juniper
and unwinged, hard seeds. Some are misleadingly called cedars, the common name for species in the Genus Cedrus. A number of species (such as J. chinensis from East Asia) are used in landscaping and horticulture. Junipers have distinctive false-fruits: small cones in which the waxy scales fuse together to form a fleshy "berry-like" structure. In some species these "berries" are red-brown or orange but in most they are blue and very aromatic. Some junipers are peculiar in that they have two types of evergreen leaves. Seedlings and the young twigs of older trees have small needle-like leaves. Most of the branches
 
Jujube
Jujube Jujube, Chinese Date, or Tsao(棗) is a small deciduous tree of the Buckthorn family that can reach 30 or 40 feet in height. It originated in China, where it has been grown for over 4,000 years. The tree is ornamental, with shiny-green leaves, and sometimes thorns. The many inconspicuous flowers are small, greenish or white, and produce an olive-sized fruit that is a drupe. The early-picked fruit is smooth-green, and resembles the consistency and taste of
 



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