Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Cactus
Cactus Cacti Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Caryophyllales Family: Cactaceae Cacti or cactuses are succulent plants, well known natives of desert areas in the Americas. They have also become naturalized to similar environments in other areas. An individual plant is called a cactus. Like other succulents, cacti are well-adapted to life with little precipitation. Their leaves have evolved into needles, which in addition to
 
Bromeliaceae
Bromeliaceae Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Liliopsida Order: Bromeliales Family: Bromeliaceae Bromeliads include epiphytes, such as Spanish moss, and ground plants, such as the pineapple. Many bromeliads have a "cup" formed by their tightly-overlapping leaves, in which they store water. However, the family is diverse enough to include the cup-type epiphytes, grey-leaved Tillandsias (which gather water only from leaf structures called trichomes), and even a large number of desert-dwelling
 
Liliaceae
Nothoscordum Odontostomum Ophiopogon Ornithogalum - Star of Bethlehem Paris Peliosanthes Phaedranassa Phalangium Polygonatum - Solomons seal Prosartes Quamasia Roulinia Salomonia Schoenocaulon Scilla Scoliopus Selonia Smilacina - False Solomons seal Stenanthium Streptopus Stropholirion Theropogon Tofieldia Tovaria Toxicoscordion Tracyanthus Tricyrtis Trillium - Trillium or wake-robin Triteleia Tulbaghia Tulipa - Tulip Tupistra Unifolium Urceolina Vagnera Veratrum Wurmbea Xerophyllum Zephyranthes Zigadenus Zygadenus An orange daylily The Liliaceae, or the Lily Family, is an important family of monocotyledons that includes a great number of important ornamental flowers. Plants in this family have linear leaves, mostly with parallel veins, and flower parts in threes. The family Smilacaceae
 
Canna lily
Canna lily Canna lily Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Liliopsida Order: Zingiberales Family: Cannaceae Genus: Canna Species The canna lily is a tropical and subtropical summer-blooming plant with broad flat leaves that grow out of a stem in a long narrow roll and then unfurl. The plants grow over five feet tall but are most often around three feet tall; they often bloom red, yellow, orange, or any combination of
 
Maple
can be striking. They have five sepals, five petals about 3 mm long, twelve stamens about 1 cm long in two rings of six, and two pistils or a pistil with two styles. The ovary is superior and has two carpels, whose wings elongate the flowers, making it easy to tell which flowers are female. Within a few weeks of blooming, the trees drop large numbers of seeds. The leaves in most species are palmately veined, with 3-9 veins, one of which is in the middle. Several species, including the paperbark maples, Acer griseum, Manchurian maple, Acer mandshuricum, Nikko maple, Acer
 
Venus Flytrap
Venus Flytrap Venus Flytrap Photo: Valery Beaud National Agricultural Library Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Nepenthales Family: Droseraceae Genus: Dionaea Species: muscipula Binomial name Dionaea muscipula The Venus Flytrap is a carnivorous plant. It catches its prey (insects and arachnids, mostly flies and spiders) by snapping its leaves closed, much like animals do with their mouths; indeed, the edges of the leaves are equipped with protrusions that look like a set of teeth. Once the insect has been captured,
 
Welwitschia
Welwitschia Welwitschia is a monotypic genus of succulent plant, consisting exclusively of the very odd Welwitschia mirabilis Hook. f. Welwitschia is the only genus of the family Welwitschiacae, in the order Gnetales, in the class Gnetopsida. This is a desert plant which grows from a short, thick trunk, with only two leaves that continuously grow from their base, and a long, thick taproot. Shortly after germination, the apex of the plant dies, leaving
 
Juniper
and unwinged, hard seeds. Some are misleadingly called cedars, the common name for species in the Genus Cedrus. A number of species (such as J. chinensis from East Asia) are used in landscaping and horticulture. Junipers have distinctive false-fruits: small cones in which the waxy scales fuse together to form a fleshy "berry-like" structure. In some species these "berries" are red-brown or orange but in most they are blue and very aromatic. Some junipers are peculiar in that they have two types of evergreen leaves. Seedlings and the young twigs of older trees have small needle-like leaves. Most of the branches
 
Brocchinia reducta
Brocchinia reducta Brocchinia reducta is one of few carnivorous bromeliads. It is native to southern Venezuela and Guyana, and is found in nutrient-poor soil. B. reducta, like many other bromeliads, forms a water-storing cup with its tightly-overlapping leaves. The leaves surrounding the cup of B. reducta are coated with loose, waxy scales. These scales are highly reflective
 



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