Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Kudzu
the pea family. Kudzu is common throughout most of the southeastern United States and has been found as far north as Pennsylvania. The name comes from Japanese kazu (葛), meaning vine. Kudzu vines can make walking across the land nearly impossible, as it takes over all horizontal and vertical surfaces, both natural and manmade. Its dense vegetation obstructs all views and movement into the area. It kills or degrades other plants by smothering them under a solid blanket of leaves, by girdling woody stems and tree trunks, and by breaking branches or uprooting entire trees and shrubs through the sheer force
 
Syngonium
Syngonium Syngonium is a genus of about 30 species, from tropical rain forests in Central and South America. These woody climbers have leaves that change shape according to teh plant's stage of growth, and adult leaf forms are often much more lobed than the juvenile forms usually seen on small pot plants. Syngonium podophyllum has of
 
Fouquieria
Fouquieria Fouquieria Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Ericales/Violales Family: Fouquieriaceae Genus: Fouquieria Species Fouquieria columnaris Fouquieria splendens et al Fouquieria is a genus of about 10 species of desert plants in the family Fouquieriaceae including the ocotillo (F. splendens) and the boojum tree (F. columnaris). They have succulent stems with thinner spikes projecting from them, with leaves on the spikes. They are unrelated to cacti and do not look much like them; their stems are
 
Bromeliaceae
Bromeliaceae Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Liliopsida Order: Bromeliales Family: Bromeliaceae Bromeliads include epiphytes, such as Spanish moss, and ground plants, such as the pineapple. Many bromeliads have a "cup" formed by their tightly-overlapping leaves, in which they store water. However, the family is diverse enough to include the cup-type epiphytes, grey-leaved Tillandsias (which gather water only from leaf structures called trichomes), and even a large number of desert-dwelling
 
Venus Flytrap
Venus Flytrap Venus Flytrap Photo: Valery Beaud National Agricultural Library Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Nepenthales Family: Droseraceae Genus: Dionaea Species: muscipula Binomial name Dionaea muscipula The Venus Flytrap is a carnivorous plant. It catches its prey (insects and arachnids, mostly flies and spiders) by snapping its leaves closed, much like animals do with their mouths; indeed, the edges of the leaves are equipped with protrusions that look like a set of teeth. Once the insect has been captured,
 
Taro
Taro Several small lo'i or pondfields in which taro (or kalo) is being grown in Hawai'i (). Taro (possibly a Maori word, it is kalo in Hawaiian) is a tropical plant (Colocasia esculenta in the Family Araceae) grown for its edible stem or corm and leaves. Flowers are also eaten. The word kalo refers to the corm. Taro is closely related to elephant ear and Caladium, plants commonly
 
Variegation
Variegation Variegation is the appearance of differently coloured zones in the leaves, and sometimes the stems, of plants. This may be due to a number of causes. Some variegation is attractive and ornamental, and gardeners tend to preserve these. The term is also sometimes used to refer to colour zonation in flowers. Table of contents showTocToggle("show","hide") 1 Chimeral variegation 2
 
Kudzu
the pea family. Kudzu is common throughout most of the southeastern United States and has been found as far north as Pennsylvania. The name comes from Japanese kazu (葛), meaning vine. Kudzu vines can make walking across the land nearly impossible, as it takes over all horizontal and vertical surfaces, both natural and manmade. Its dense vegetation obstructs all views and movement into the area. It kills or degrades other plants by smothering them under a solid blanket of leaves, by girdling woody stems and tree trunks, and by breaking branches or uprooting entire trees and shrubs through the sheer force
 
Toxicodendron
shrubs and vines, all of which produce a skin-irritating oil, urushiol, which can cause a severe allergic reaction; hence the scientific name which means "poison tree". Members of this family were formerly included in the genus Rhus. Members of this genus have pinnately- compound, alternate leaves and whitish or grayish drupes. The best known member is poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans, which is practically ubiquitous throughout eastern North America. The plants are quite variable in appearance. Leaves may have smooth, toothed or lobed edges, and all three types of leaves may be present in a single plant. Plants grow as creeping vines,
 
Ichthyothere
Ichthyothere Ichthyothere Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Asterales Family: Asteraceae Genus: Ichthyothere Species Ichthyothere agrestis Ichthyothere granvillei Ichthyothere latifolia Ichthyothere macdanielii Ichthyothere rufa Ichthyothere scandens Ichthyothere terminalis Ichthyothere is a genus of plants found in parts of South America (the Amazon). The name ichthyothere literally translates as fish poison -- the active constituent ichthyothereol is a polyacetylene compound so toxic to fish that they will jump out of the water if I. terminalis leaves are used as bait. Ichthyothereol 3-hydroxy-2-(trans-non-1-ene-3,5,7-triynyl)tetrahydropyran
 



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