Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Liliaceae
Nothoscordum Odontostomum Ophiopogon Ornithogalum - Star of Bethlehem Paris Peliosanthes Phaedranassa Phalangium Polygonatum - Solomons seal Prosartes Quamasia Roulinia Salomonia Schoenocaulon Scilla Scoliopus Selonia Smilacina - False Solomons seal Stenanthium Streptopus Stropholirion Theropogon Tofieldia Tovaria Toxicoscordion Tracyanthus Tricyrtis Trillium - Trillium or wake-robin Triteleia Tulbaghia Tulipa - Tulip Tupistra Unifolium Urceolina Vagnera Veratrum Wurmbea Xerophyllum Zephyranthes Zigadenus Zygadenus An orange daylily The Liliaceae, or the Lily Family, is an important family of monocotyledons that includes a great number of important ornamental flowers. Plants in this family have linear leaves, mostly with parallel veins, and flower parts in threes. The family Smilacaceae
 
Spikemoss
Spikemoss Spikemoss Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Lycophyta Class: Selaginellopsida Order: Selaginellales Family: Selaginellaceae Genus: Selaginella Species   Selaginella apoda   Selaginella eclipes   Selaginella rupestris Spikemoss refers to any plant of the genus Selaginella, in the family Selaginellaceae, in the order Selaginellales, in the class Selaginellopsida, in the division Lycophyta. Many workers still place the Selaginellales in the class Lycopsida. This group of plants are considered to be part of the fern allies. The spikemosses are creeping or ascendant plants with simple, scale-like leaves on branching stems from which roots also arise. The plants are heterosporous. Significant spikemosses
 
Cactus
Cactus Cacti Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Caryophyllales Family: Cactaceae Cacti or cactuses are succulent plants, well known natives of desert areas in the Americas. They have also become naturalized to similar environments in other areas. An individual plant is called a cactus. Like other succulents, cacti are well-adapted to life with little precipitation. Their leaves have evolved into needles, which in addition to
 
Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Toxicodendron
shrubs and vines, all of which produce a skin-irritating oil, urushiol, which can cause a severe allergic reaction; hence the scientific name which means "poison tree". Members of this family were formerly included in the genus Rhus. Members of this genus have pinnately- compound, alternate leaves and whitish or grayish drupes. The best known member is poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans, which is practically ubiquitous throughout eastern North America. The plants are quite variable in appearance. Leaves may have smooth, toothed or lobed edges, and all three types of leaves may be present in a single plant. Plants grow as creeping vines,
 
Venus Flytrap
Venus Flytrap Venus Flytrap Photo: Valery Beaud National Agricultural Library Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Nepenthales Family: Droseraceae Genus: Dionaea Species: muscipula Binomial name Dionaea muscipula The Venus Flytrap is a carnivorous plant. It catches its prey (insects and arachnids, mostly flies and spiders) by snapping its leaves closed, much like animals do with their mouths; indeed, the edges of the leaves are equipped with protrusions that look like a set of teeth. Once the insect has been captured,
 
Breadfruit
Breadfruit Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Family Moraceae) is a tree – and its fruit – native to East Indian and Pacific islands that has been widely planted in tropical regions everywhere. It was first collected and distributed by Lieutenant William Bligh as one of the botanical samples collected by HMS Bounty in the late 18th century. Breadfruit is an attractive shade tree with large leaves deeply cut into pinnate lobes.
 
Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Maple
can be striking. They have five sepals, five petals about 3 mm long, twelve stamens about 1 cm long in two rings of six, and two pistils or a pistil with two styles. The ovary is superior and has two carpels, whose wings elongate the flowers, making it easy to tell which flowers are female. Within a few weeks of blooming, the trees drop large numbers of seeds. The leaves in most species are palmately veined, with 3-9 veins, one of which is in the middle. Several species, including the paperbark maples, Acer griseum, Manchurian maple, Acer mandshuricum, Nikko maple, Acer
 
Cactus
Cactus Cacti Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Caryophyllales Family: Cactaceae Cacti or cactuses are succulent plants, well known natives of desert areas in the Americas. They have also become naturalized to similar environments in other areas. An individual plant is called a cactus. Like other succulents, cacti are well-adapted to life with little precipitation. Their leaves have evolved into needles, which in addition to
 



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