Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Taro
Taro Several small lo'i or pondfields in which taro (or kalo) is being grown in Hawai'i (). Taro (possibly a Maori word, it is kalo in Hawaiian) is a tropical plant (Colocasia esculenta in the Family Araceae) grown for its edible stem or corm and leaves. Flowers are also eaten. The word kalo refers to the corm. Taro is closely related to elephant ear and Caladium, plants commonly
 
Aaron's rod
Aaron's rod Aaron's rod is the popular name given to various tall flowering plants (hag taper, goldenrod, etc.). In architecture, the term is given to an ornamental rod with sprouting leaves, or sometimes with a serpent entwined round it (from the Biblical references in Exodus vii. 10 and Numbers xvii. 8). Based on an article from a well-known encyclopedia published in
 
Wandering Jew (plant)
Commonly called the Wandering Jew, the Tradescantia pallida or Setcreasea purpurea is an evergreen perennial plant with elongated pointy leaves and small three-petaled pink flowers with yellow stamens. The leaves are most often purple, though another common variety has green and purple leaves; rarer varieties are green and white or variegated. The plant thrives in sun or light shade in subtropical areas, grows to about a foot tall, and is typically used as an ornamental in gardens and borders. The plant is also used as a ground cover or hanging plant. The plant propagates easily by cuttings; the stems are visibly
 
Aspidistra
Aspidistra Aspidistra is a genus of plants of the family Liliaceae or Convallariaceae, originating from China. Species A. elatior (aspidistra, iron plant, barroom plant, cast-iron plant) is a tough ornamental plant with leathery dark green leaves, growing up to 1 m. The plant was once so popular in British homes that George Orwell satirized
 
Liliaceae
Nothoscordum Odontostomum Ophiopogon Ornithogalum - Star of Bethlehem Paris Peliosanthes Phaedranassa Phalangium Polygonatum - Solomons seal Prosartes Quamasia Roulinia Salomonia Schoenocaulon Scilla Scoliopus Selonia Smilacina - False Solomons seal Stenanthium Streptopus Stropholirion Theropogon Tofieldia Tovaria Toxicoscordion Tracyanthus Tricyrtis Trillium - Trillium or wake-robin Triteleia Tulbaghia Tulipa - Tulip Tupistra Unifolium Urceolina Vagnera Veratrum Wurmbea Xerophyllum Zephyranthes Zigadenus Zygadenus An orange daylily The Liliaceae, or the Lily Family, is an important family of monocotyledons that includes a great number of important ornamental flowers. Plants in this family have linear leaves, mostly with parallel veins, and flower parts in threes. The family Smilacaceae
 
Brocchinia reducta
Brocchinia reducta Brocchinia reducta is one of few carnivorous bromeliads. It is native to southern Venezuela and Guyana, and is found in nutrient-poor soil. B. reducta, like many other bromeliads, forms a water-storing cup with its tightly-overlapping leaves. The leaves surrounding the cup of B. reducta are coated with loose, waxy scales. These scales are highly reflective
 
Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Sundew
Sundew Sundew. Sundews are members of the genus Drosera, consisting of about 90 species of carnivorous plants. Examples of the sundew family can be found on every continent but Antarctica, they are specially abundant in South Africa and Australia. They can be found in most soil conditions, acid, sandy, stony and boggy places. The leaves have stalks with drops of
 
Dieffenbachia
Dieffenbachia Dieffenbachia is a genus of tropical monocots with patterned leaves. Members of this genus are grown as houseplants. The cells of the plant contain needle-shaped calcium oxalate crystals. If a leaf is chewed, these crystals cause a burning sensation in the mouth and throat; swelling can occur along with a temporary inability to
 
Violet (plant)
Violet (plant) Violets Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Violales Family: Violaceae Genus: Viola Species Viola tricolor var. arvensis Viola bicolor Pursh Viola tricolor Viola beckwithii Viola nephrophylla Violets (genus Viola) are flowers of the family Violaceae, common in Europe in slightly shaded conditions such as hedgerows. Violets are small perennial plants with large heart-shaped leaves which flower profusely in spring. This genus includes pansies and the smaller spreading plants known as either Johnny jump ups. There are two wild varieties, the most common having dark blue flowers, and the less commmon having white flowers
 



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