Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Acacia
Americas. Australian species are often called wattles. The small flowers are arranged in rounded or elongated clusters. The leaves are compound pinnate in general (see fig.). In some instances, however, more especially in the Australian species, the leaflets are suppressed and the leaf-stalks become vertically flattened, and serve the purpose of leaves. The vertical position protects the structure from the intense sunlight, as with their edges towards the sky and earth they do not intercept light so fully as ordinary horizontally placed leaves. Various species yield gum. True gum arabic is the product of Acacia senegal, abundant in both east and
 
Canna lily
Canna lily Canna lily Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Liliopsida Order: Zingiberales Family: Cannaceae Genus: Canna Species The canna lily is a tropical and subtropical summer-blooming plant with broad flat leaves that grow out of a stem in a long narrow roll and then unfurl. The plants grow over five feet tall but are most often around three feet tall; they often bloom red, yellow, orange, or any combination of
 
Spikemoss
Spikemoss Spikemoss Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Lycophyta Class: Selaginellopsida Order: Selaginellales Family: Selaginellaceae Genus: Selaginella Species   Selaginella apoda   Selaginella eclipes   Selaginella rupestris Spikemoss refers to any plant of the genus Selaginella, in the family Selaginellaceae, in the order Selaginellales, in the class Selaginellopsida, in the division Lycophyta. Many workers still place the Selaginellales in the class Lycopsida. This group of plants are considered to be part of the fern allies. The spikemosses are creeping or ascendant plants with simple, scale-like leaves on branching stems from which roots also arise. The plants are heterosporous. Significant spikemosses
 
Venus Flytrap
spiders) by snapping its leaves closed, much like animals do with their mouths; indeed, the edges of the leaves are equipped with protrusions that look like a set of teeth. Once the insect has been captured, the plant digests and absorbs it. The leaf then opens, and wind blows (or the rain washes) away the insect's remains. Each leaf can digest only several times, after which it withers and dies. The Venus flytrap may be the source of legends about man-eating plants. The tip of the leaf is divided into two hinged lobes that form a trap. There are many traps
 
Spikemoss
Spikemoss Spikemoss Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Lycophyta Class: Selaginellopsida Order: Selaginellales Family: Selaginellaceae Genus: Selaginella Species   Selaginella apoda   Selaginella eclipes   Selaginella rupestris Spikemoss refers to any plant of the genus Selaginella, in the family Selaginellaceae, in the order Selaginellales, in the class Selaginellopsida, in the division Lycophyta. Many workers still place the Selaginellales in the class Lycopsida. This group of plants are considered to be part of the fern allies. The spikemosses are creeping or ascendant plants with simple, scale-like leaves on branching stems from which roots also arise. The plants are heterosporous. Significant spikemosses
 
Cactus
Cactus Cacti Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Caryophyllales Family: Cactaceae Cacti or cactuses are succulent plants, well known natives of desert areas in the Americas. They have also become naturalized to similar environments in other areas. An individual plant is called a cactus. Like other succulents, cacti are well-adapted to life with little precipitation. Their leaves have evolved into needles, which in addition to
 
Toxicodendron
shrubs and vines, all of which produce a skin-irritating oil, urushiol, which can cause a severe allergic reaction; hence the scientific name which means "poison tree". Members of this family were formerly included in the genus Rhus. Members of this genus have pinnately- compound, alternate leaves and whitish or grayish drupes. The best known member is poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans, which is practically ubiquitous throughout eastern North America. The plants are quite variable in appearance. Leaves may have smooth, toothed or lobed edges, and all three types of leaves may be present in a single plant. Plants grow as creeping vines,
 
Juniper
and unwinged, hard seeds. Some are misleadingly called cedars, the common name for species in the Genus Cedrus. A number of species (such as J. chinensis from East Asia) are used in landscaping and horticulture. Junipers have distinctive false-fruits: small cones in which the waxy scales fuse together to form a fleshy "berry-like" structure. In some species these "berries" are red-brown or orange but in most they are blue and very aromatic. Some junipers are peculiar in that they have two types of evergreen leaves. Seedlings and the young twigs of older trees have small needle-like leaves. Most of the branches
 
Welwitschia
Welwitschia Welwitschia is a monotypic genus of succulent plant, consisting exclusively of the very odd Welwitschia mirabilis Hook. f. Welwitschia is the only genus of the family Welwitschiacae, in the order Gnetales, in the class Gnetopsida. This is a desert plant which grows from a short, thick trunk, with only two leaves that continuously grow from their base, and a long, thick taproot. Shortly after germination, the apex of the plant dies, leaving
 
Gloriosa
Gloriosa Gloriosa is a genus of five species of the Liliaceae, from tropical Asia and Africa. They are tuberous rooted deciduous perennials, adapted to a monsoon climate with a dormant dry season. They climb or scramble over other plants, with the aid of tendrils at the ends of their leaves, and can reach 3 meters in height.
 



Web-Indexes.Com
Tillandsia Ionantha