Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Uncaria
Uncaria Uncaria is a genus of plants known colloquially as "Gambier", "Cat's Claw" or "Uña de Gato", which are found in Asia, Africa, and South America. There are about 34 species. Malaysian Gambier (U. gambir) is a large tropical vine with typical rubiaceous leaves, which are opposite and about 10 cm long. At the
 
Evergreen
Evergreen This article is about plant types. For other uses see Evergreen (disambiguation) Evergreen has two meanings in relation to plants: Evergreen means a plant retaining its foliage year-round (a botanist would say the leaves are persistent or not deciduous). Most tropical plants are naturally "evergreen" in this sense, the main exceptions being species growing in arid climates or climates with an extreme dry season.
 
Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Spikemoss
Spikemoss Spikemoss Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Lycophyta Class: Selaginellopsida Order: Selaginellales Family: Selaginellaceae Genus: Selaginella Species   Selaginella apoda   Selaginella eclipes   Selaginella rupestris Spikemoss refers to any plant of the genus Selaginella, in the family Selaginellaceae, in the order Selaginellales, in the class Selaginellopsida, in the division Lycophyta. Many workers still place the Selaginellales in the class Lycopsida. This group of plants are considered to be part of the fern allies. The spikemosses are creeping or ascendant plants with simple, scale-like leaves on branching stems from which roots also arise. The plants are heterosporous. Significant spikemosses
 
Jean Senebier
Jean Senebier Jean Senebier (May 6, 1742 - July 22, 1809) was a Swiss pastor who wrote many works on vegetable physiology. He was born at Geneva, and is remembered for his contributions to the understanding of the influence of light on vegetation. Though Marcello Malpighi and Stephen Hales had shown that much of the substance of plants must be obtained from the atmosphere, no progress was made until Charles Bonnet observed on leaves plunged in aerated water bubbles of gas, which Joseph Priestley recognized as
 
Gloriosa
Gloriosa Gloriosa is a genus of five species of the Liliaceae, from tropical Asia and Africa. They are tuberous rooted deciduous perennials, adapted to a monsoon climate with a dormant dry season. They climb or scramble over other plants, with the aid of tendrils at the ends of their leaves, and can reach 3 meters in height.
 
Acacia
Americas. Australian species are often called wattles. The small flowers are arranged in rounded or elongated clusters. The leaves are compound pinnate in general (see fig.). In some instances, however, more especially in the Australian species, the leaflets are suppressed and the leaf-stalks become vertically flattened, and serve the purpose of leaves. The vertical position protects the structure from the intense sunlight, as with their edges towards the sky and earth they do not intercept light so fully as ordinary horizontally placed leaves. Various species yield gum. True gum arabic is the product of Acacia senegal, abundant in both east and
 
Taro
Taro Several small lo'i or pondfields in which taro (or kalo) is being grown in Hawai'i (). Taro (possibly a Maori word, it is kalo in Hawaiian) is a tropical plant (Colocasia esculenta in the Family Araceae) grown for its edible stem or corm and leaves. Flowers are also eaten. The word kalo refers to the corm. Taro is closely related to elephant ear and Caladium, plants commonly
 
Juniper
and unwinged, hard seeds. Some are misleadingly called cedars, the common name for species in the Genus Cedrus. A number of species (such as J. chinensis from East Asia) are used in landscaping and horticulture. Junipers have distinctive false-fruits: small cones in which the waxy scales fuse together to form a fleshy "berry-like" structure. In some species these "berries" are red-brown or orange but in most they are blue and very aromatic. Some junipers are peculiar in that they have two types of evergreen leaves. Seedlings and the young twigs of older trees have small needle-like leaves. Most of the branches
 
Venus Flytrap
Venus Flytrap Venus Flytrap Photo: Valery Beaud National Agricultural Library Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Nepenthales Family: Droseraceae Genus: Dionaea Species: muscipula Binomial name Dionaea muscipula The Venus Flytrap is a carnivorous plant. It catches its prey (insects and arachnids, mostly flies and spiders) by snapping its leaves closed, much like animals do with their mouths; indeed, the edges of the leaves are equipped with protrusions that look like a set of teeth. Once the insect has been captured,
 



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