Plants
Welcome to our new site about Plants

Plants

Currently our only active section is Air Plants as you'll see in the left navigation menu - more sections and articles will be added as we write them.
Until then we have added links to a variety of wikipedia articles you can check out, just in case you're not into Air Plants.

Enjoy



Maple
can be striking. They have five sepals, five petals about 3 mm long, twelve stamens about 1 cm long in two rings of six, and two pistils or a pistil with two styles. The ovary is superior and has two carpels, whose wings elongate the flowers, making it easy to tell which flowers are female. Within a few weeks of blooming, the trees drop large numbers of seeds. The leaves in most species are palmately veined, with 3-9 veins, one of which is in the middle. Several species, including the paperbark maples, Acer griseum, Manchurian maple, Acer mandshuricum, Nikko maple, Acer
 
Aspidistra
Aspidistra Aspidistra is a genus of plants of the family Liliaceae or Convallariaceae, originating from China. Species A. elatior (aspidistra, iron plant, barroom plant, cast-iron plant) is a tough ornamental plant with leathery dark green leaves, growing up to 1 m. The plant was once so popular in British homes that George Orwell satirized
 
Droseraceae
Droseraceae The Droseraceae are a family of carnivorous plants and commonly known as the Sundew Family. They include the sundews and butterworts, which produce sticky substances that trap prey, and the Venus fly trap, which has leaves modified to form traps that close when disturbed. This article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia
 
Breadfruit
Breadfruit Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Family Moraceae) is a tree – and its fruit – native to East Indian and Pacific islands that has been widely planted in tropical regions everywhere. It was first collected and distributed by Lieutenant William Bligh as one of the botanical samples collected by HMS Bounty in the late 18th century. Breadfruit is an attractive shade tree with large leaves deeply cut into pinnate lobes.
 
Ichthyothere
Ichthyothere Ichthyothere Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Asterales Family: Asteraceae Genus: Ichthyothere Species Ichthyothere agrestis Ichthyothere granvillei Ichthyothere latifolia Ichthyothere macdanielii Ichthyothere rufa Ichthyothere scandens Ichthyothere terminalis Ichthyothere is a genus of plants found in parts of South America (the Amazon). The name ichthyothere literally translates as fish poison -- the active constituent ichthyothereol is a polyacetylene compound so toxic to fish that they will jump out of the water if I. terminalis leaves are used as bait. Ichthyothereol 3-hydroxy-2-(trans-non-1-ene-3,5,7-triynyl)tetrahydropyran
 
Toxicodendron
shrubs and vines, all of which produce a skin-irritating oil, urushiol, which can cause a severe allergic reaction; hence the scientific name which means "poison tree". Members of this family were formerly included in the genus Rhus. Members of this genus have pinnately- compound, alternate leaves and whitish or grayish drupes. The best known member is poison ivy, Toxicodendron radicans, which is practically ubiquitous throughout eastern North America. The plants are quite variable in appearance. Leaves may have smooth, toothed or lobed edges, and all three types of leaves may be present in a single plant. Plants grow as creeping vines,
 
Fouquieria
Fouquieria Fouquieria Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae Division: Magnoliophyta Class: Magnoliopsida Order: Ericales/Violales Family: Fouquieriaceae Genus: Fouquieria Species Fouquieria columnaris Fouquieria splendens et al Fouquieria is a genus of about 10 species of desert plants in the family Fouquieriaceae including the ocotillo (F. splendens) and the boojum tree (F. columnaris). They have succulent stems with thinner spikes projecting from them, with leaves on the spikes. They are unrelated to cacti and do not look much like them; their stems are
 
Venus Flytrap
spiders) by snapping its leaves closed, much like animals do with their mouths; indeed, the edges of the leaves are equipped with protrusions that look like a set of teeth. Once the insect has been captured, the plant digests and absorbs it. The leaf then opens, and wind blows (or the rain washes) away the insect's remains. Each leaf can digest only several times, after which it withers and dies. The Venus flytrap may be the source of legends about man-eating plants. The tip of the leaf is divided into two hinged lobes that form a trap. There are many traps
 
Juniper
chinensis Juniperus coahuilensis Juniperus communis Juniperus conferta Juniperus deppeana Juniperus × fassettii Juniperus flaccida Juniperus horizontalis Juniperus monosperma Juniperus occidentalis Juniperus osteosperma Juniperus pinchotii Juniperus sabina Juniperus scopulorum Juniperus virginiana and many more Ref.: ITIS 18047 A juniper is a coniferous plant in the Genus Juniperus of the Family Cupressaceae. There are about 50 species of junipers, widely distributed throughout the northern hemisphere to tropical Africa. These vary in size and shape from tall columnar forms to low cones or spreading platter-like shrubs with long trailing branches. Junipers are monoecious or dioecious trees or shrubs with either needle-like or scale-like leaves,
 
Taro
Taro Several small lo'i or pondfields in which taro (or kalo) is being grown in Hawai'i (). Taro (possibly a Maori word, it is kalo in Hawaiian) is a tropical plant (Colocasia esculenta in the Family Araceae) grown for its edible stem or corm and leaves. Flowers are also eaten. The word kalo refers to the corm. Taro is closely related to elephant ear and Caladium, plants commonly
 



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